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Cambridge Stud loses Burgundy

New Zealand's Cambridge Stud has lost another stallion with the news released on Friday that Redoute’s Choice stallion, Burgundy, was put down at the Stud earlier Friday having contracted acute laminitis in his front feet. 

In a statement the Stud said thad Burgundy's condition had deteriorated over the past 72 hours and the decision was made between the major partners that he should not suffer further. 

The statement said - "Burgundy was a $1.3m yearling when sold by his breeders Philip and Sir Peter Vela, the owners of Pencarrow Stud. 

"Out of Group 1 winner Grand Echezeaux, he was a three-quarter brother in blood to Darci Brahma, champion sprinter in New Zealand in 2006. His dam was a three-quarter sister to the great racemare Romanee Conti, the dam of Melbourne and Caulfield Cup winner Ethereal. 

"He raced in the Te Akau colours and was described by managing owner David Ellis as “the fastest horse ever trained at Te Akau.” A multiple group winner and Group 1 placed in the Telegraph Handicap, Burgundy retired to stud with the credentials to become a stallion and he was syndicated to stand at Cambridge."

The statement said that Burgundy will be missed by everyone at Cambridge. 

"Part of the stallion line up for seven years, he was a charming, unassuming character who went about his routine with the minimum of fuss. Although the Cambridge team all handled him from time to time, he was the particular favourite of Julian Corban and we know that “Jules” will miss him more than anyone. 

"Our sincere thanks go to the Cambridge Equine Team with Rob Hitchcock and Alanna Zantingh. Their efforts in trying to save Burgundy were unrelenting. 

"We also recognise our own team in what has been an extremely difficult year. Thanks to Sean, Davo, Kenny and Julian for everything - your contribution has been above and beyond."

Earlier this season the young international sire Roaring Lion (USA) had to be put down shortly after arriving in New Zealand after losing a battle with colic. Then in October Tavistock was withdrawn from service after sustaining a near foot injury which impacted his ability to cover. At the time Tavistock had covered 76 mares out of a large book with 43 in foal and 23 under service.

Burgundy, picture Trish Dunell

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